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In this way the abstract and yet differential force of colour disrupts capitalist circulation, just as photography overcomes its own limits by becoming painting. While this does not accomplish a political revolution, it is revolutionary. Speaking of his own technique he says;. Sylvester , The sublime intuition frees the nervous system from its conceptual determination, forcing the brain to confront chaos and construct an analogical expression of it. While Deleuze argues that Bacon and Fromanger use the photograph against itself, his analysis of cinema is not so generous.

The very ontology of cinema, its essence as movement- and time-image is founded on not being photography. The movement-image, however, only indirectly expresses the becoming of the open whole of duration because it passes through the sensory-motor schema of the viewer, and so makes subjective interest and value its condition of possibility. It is as if the movement-image brings us back to a disappointingly transcendental subject, the brain of the human-all-too-human cinema-goer who cannot escape the assumption that the universe is in some way for us.

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This too, will be an image that emerges against photography, and even perhaps through its negation. But the form of what changes does not itself change, does not pass on. At this sublime moment transcendental experience i. This sublime moment, or event, is thought. Benjamin, he says, set himself.

Deleuze , While the electronic-image is able to express duration like the time-image, in doing so it also extends technological and political control beyond the limits of space and time, and out into the infinite. According to Deleuze the electronic-image has no outside, it has a right side and a reverse, and is reversible and non-superimposable. These aspects of the electronic-image, it is important to note, are no longer specific to the cinema, but condition all aspects of image production, and inasmuch as they are co-extensive, all aspects of life in general.

The political stakes of the electronic-image are therefore those of contemporary life, and revolve around the status of thought; what in this flat brain-screen of the electronic-image is creative, and what exercises control? Deleuze is at his most uncertain here, and is clearly reluctant to speculate very far about an image regime that was still embryonic.

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Bresson, he tells us, first reveals how modern psychological automata are produced by the speech act rather than motor action. These anticipations of aspects of the electronic-image in the time-image created remarkable images and new sensations, but while they reveal the creative potentials of the Modernist will-to-art they also illustrate how quickly these are instrumentalized by the powers that control their production.

The problem is that the brain-screen has no outside, it encompasses the world in a continual variation that nevertheless tends to be organized by a limited number of aesthetic axioms. Deleuze , — The electronic-image, unlike the time-image perhaps, defines both the means of control and the means to its resistance. This then, is the situation confronting visual art today, inasmuch as post-conceptual artistic practice is generally taken to mean that contemporary art, no matter how aesthetic, is nevertheless organized through a conceptual framework.

In this sense the readymade is a technique used to create a refrain, a material object that expresses ie. In the case of the stage-maker bird, it both establishes a territory and opens it onto its outside, because the maintenance of one involves the necessity of the other, just as the present draws from the past in order to create its future.

The refrain, in this sense, expresses a spatio-temporal dynamism. Here we have the beginning of a genealogy of contemporary artistic practice that incorporates the readymade as its foundational moment, but rather than being post-conceptual involves, instead, producing material sensations through a sublime thought.

This would be to go beyond the definition of contemporary art as postconceptual and post-internet, and to seek once again the real conditions of its difference. There, Kant argues that sensation emerges as an intense difference from 0, and Deleuze and Guattari will return to this definition of sensation throughout their work. The readymade is first a sublime moment dislocating experience from its conceptual conditions, and allowing it to receive the aleatory forces of the event.

What he means by this is that the reflective aesthetic judgment found in the third Critique must replace the conceptual understanding determining experience as it appears in the first. Instead Deleuze and Guattari call for an aesthetic post -conceptual art, a sublime art that affirms the power of thought to accelerate our cybernetic machines beyond the limits of their current subjectivations qua productions of statistical masses. Translated by Robin Mackay. Bergson, Henri.


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Creative Evolution. Translated by Arthur Mitchell. New York: Random House. Bleyen, Mieke, ed. Leuven: Leuven University Press. Deleuze, Gilles. Deleuze - Second lesson on Kant, 21 March, Translated by Melissa McMahon. Accessed September Available at www. Cinema 1, The Movement-Image. Translated by Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Cinema 2, The Time-Image. Translated by Hugh Tomlinson and Roberta Galeta. Difference and Repetition. Translated by Paul Patton. New York: Columbia University Press. Negotiations, — Translated by Martin Joughin. London: Black Dog Publishing.

While this does not accomplish a political revolution, it is revolutionary. Speaking of his own technique he says;. Sylvester , The sublime intuition frees the nervous system from its conceptual determination, forcing the brain to confront chaos and construct an analogical expression of it. While Deleuze argues that Bacon and Fromanger use the photograph against itself, his analysis of cinema is not so generous. The very ontology of cinema, its essence as movement- and time-image is founded on not being photography.

The movement-image, however, only indirectly expresses the becoming of the open whole of duration because it passes through the sensory-motor schema of the viewer, and so makes subjective interest and value its condition of possibility.

Difference and Repetition by Gilles Deleuze

It is as if the movement-image brings us back to a disappointingly transcendental subject, the brain of the human-all-too-human cinema-goer who cannot escape the assumption that the universe is in some way for us. This too, will be an image that emerges against photography, and even perhaps through its negation. But the form of what changes does not itself change, does not pass on. At this sublime moment transcendental experience i. This sublime moment, or event, is thought. Benjamin, he says, set himself.

Deleuze , While the electronic-image is able to express duration like the time-image, in doing so it also extends technological and political control beyond the limits of space and time, and out into the infinite. According to Deleuze the electronic-image has no outside, it has a right side and a reverse, and is reversible and non-superimposable.

Difference and Repetition

These aspects of the electronic-image, it is important to note, are no longer specific to the cinema, but condition all aspects of image production, and inasmuch as they are co-extensive, all aspects of life in general. The political stakes of the electronic-image are therefore those of contemporary life, and revolve around the status of thought; what in this flat brain-screen of the electronic-image is creative, and what exercises control?

Deleuze is at his most uncertain here, and is clearly reluctant to speculate very far about an image regime that was still embryonic. Bresson, he tells us, first reveals how modern psychological automata are produced by the speech act rather than motor action. These anticipations of aspects of the electronic-image in the time-image created remarkable images and new sensations, but while they reveal the creative potentials of the Modernist will-to-art they also illustrate how quickly these are instrumentalized by the powers that control their production.

The problem is that the brain-screen has no outside, it encompasses the world in a continual variation that nevertheless tends to be organized by a limited number of aesthetic axioms. Deleuze , — The electronic-image, unlike the time-image perhaps, defines both the means of control and the means to its resistance.


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  • This then, is the situation confronting visual art today, inasmuch as post-conceptual artistic practice is generally taken to mean that contemporary art, no matter how aesthetic, is nevertheless organized through a conceptual framework. In this sense the readymade is a technique used to create a refrain, a material object that expresses ie. In the case of the stage-maker bird, it both establishes a territory and opens it onto its outside, because the maintenance of one involves the necessity of the other, just as the present draws from the past in order to create its future.

    The refrain, in this sense, expresses a spatio-temporal dynamism. Here we have the beginning of a genealogy of contemporary artistic practice that incorporates the readymade as its foundational moment, but rather than being post-conceptual involves, instead, producing material sensations through a sublime thought. This would be to go beyond the definition of contemporary art as postconceptual and post-internet, and to seek once again the real conditions of its difference.

    There, Kant argues that sensation emerges as an intense difference from 0, and Deleuze and Guattari will return to this definition of sensation throughout their work. The readymade is first a sublime moment dislocating experience from its conceptual conditions, and allowing it to receive the aleatory forces of the event.

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    What he means by this is that the reflective aesthetic judgment found in the third Critique must replace the conceptual understanding determining experience as it appears in the first. Instead Deleuze and Guattari call for an aesthetic post -conceptual art, a sublime art that affirms the power of thought to accelerate our cybernetic machines beyond the limits of their current subjectivations qua productions of statistical masses. Translated by Robin Mackay. Bergson, Henri.

    Creative Evolution. Translated by Arthur Mitchell. New York: Random House. Bleyen, Mieke, ed. Leuven: Leuven University Press. Deleuze, Gilles. Deleuze - Second lesson on Kant, 21 March, Translated by Melissa McMahon. Accessed September Available at www. Cinema 1, The Movement-Image. Translated by Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Cinema 2, The Time-Image. Translated by Hugh Tomlinson and Roberta Galeta. Difference and Repetition. Translated by Paul Patton. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Negotiations, — Translated by Martin Joughin. London: Black Dog Publishing. Translated by Sean Hand.